9 Factors to Consider When Asking for A Promotion

by McKenzie Chapman   Ulticareer  | Goals  | Job search  | Advice  | Career decision  | Job satisfaction  | Management  | Work tips  | Career advancement  | 
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Asking for a promotion is exciting, but can also be scary! If you feel ready for career advancement, don’t be afraid to ask for a promotion, but make sure you’re prepared!

 

Follow these tips to make asking for a promotion go smoothly.

 

1. Research
Do your homework before asking for a promotion. It’s your personal responsibility to ensure that you’re prepared. What has the history of promotions been at your company? What is the standard promotion for your industry? Are there certain projects you should prepare before asking? Make sure you know that you’re qualified and know specifically what promotion you’re asking for so you can best demonstrate your case.

 

2. Mention your interest

Let your superior know you’re thinking of advancing before you officially ask. Plant a seed in their mind that you’re thinking of ways to promote yourself. Drop hints that you’re looking to take on more responsibility and step up your game at work. They’ll begin to look at your work through the lens of considering giving you a promotion, so when you ask for it they’ll already have reflected on your work.

 

3. Ask for a meeting

Officially ask for a meeting to talk over your promotion. Speaking one-on-one with your boss is the best way to discuss a promotion. Don’t try to fit it into a meeting that’s about something else, rather schedule a time that’s dedicated solely to speaking about your work and your future at the company.

 

4. Come up with a new position or talk to the person vacating the position you’re looking at

After your research process, you should have a specific position in mind. This could be developing your own position, or filling a position that has been or will be vacated. If the former, you should outline the responsibilities and need for the position you have in mind. If the latter you should schedule some time to get constructive feedback from the person leaving the position you have your eye on. Their insight will be extremely helpful in gaging if it’s the right position for you and how to act once you eventually get to that position.

 

5. Get the timing right

Don’t ask for a promotion after you’ve only been working somewhere for a few months. Ask after you’ve established yourself in your current position. If you’ve just completed an impressive project and have done a job well, it’s the perfect time to ask for a promotion.

 

6. Demonstrate your value
But don’t compare yourself to others. It’s important to avoid negativity and present a positive outlook. Be confident, but not entitled. A promotion means you’ll be given more responsibility and you need to be able to prove that you’re competent by presenting good work you’ve accomplished in the past, and creative solutions for the future.

 

7. Emphasize your contributions to the company

When you’re highlighting your accomplishments, be sure to emphasize how they directly benefit the company as a whole. By asking for a promotion you’re asking to grow with the company, so show that you care by presenting concrete numbers and examples of how you have improved the company and how you plan to execute further improvements upon your promotion. Expand on the bigger picture!

 

8. Consider making a presentation

This isn’t completely necessary, but it could benefit you to compile a presentation of your research for your meeting. Make a judgment call based on your workplace and supervisor, but having visual aides to help demonstrate your case can work in your favor.

 

9. Be persistent, but not pushy

You may not get what you want right away. In this case, it’s important to follow up. Although your promotion is of course a priority to you, it may not be for your boss. Remind them of your interest, but don’t nag them about it. It may be that now isn’t the right time for you to get promoted. If this is the situation, ask to schedule another meeting in six months or so, and during that time put in extra effort to prove your value.

 

Now you’re ready to take the leap and ask for the promotion! Don’t be intimidated, just put in the work and advocate for yourself.

 

Have you asked for a promotion before? What’s the promotional ladder like at your type of job? Share your story on UltiCareer to help others who are searching for a career change get to know what your type of job is all about!

on UltiCareer to help others on their job search, get to know what your type of job is really like.


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